Scottish Ceilidh Dancing

September 8, 2014
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ceilidh-danceWhenever you’re in Scotland long enough you’ll sooner or later become familiar with your message Ceilidh, pronounced as kay-lee. Ceilidh is a gaelic word meaning gathering or celebration. Donald Mackenzie composed in 1917 in his guide ponder stories from Scottish misconception and legend towards Ceilidh: “On lengthy, dark cold weather nights it is still the custom in little villages for friends to collect in a residence and hold whatever they call a ceilidh. Old and young tend to be entertained by the reciters of old poems and popular stories which handle old thinking, the doings of traditional heroes and heroines, and so forth. Some sing old and brand-new tracks set-to old music or audio composed in how of this old.”

Nowadays Ceilidhs are still held but they vary from those of olden days in which there clearly was no radio or tv. They feature Scottish folk-music and party consequently they are sometimes held on unique occasions, eg weddings. Also held on daily basis in town halls throughout Scotland, a little more in the western compared to the east, as well as in the greater conventional resorts to amuse the guest. A Ceilidh may be great enjoyable in addition to better you're prepared the greater amount of enjoyable it's. As a ceilidh is mostly about traditional Scottish songs and dancing you might want to find out about some of the old-fashioned dances before you decide to visit a ceilidh. Listed here are three popular dances and every of these has actually a link to a web page where you are able to learn the tips to see the actual party. Here we get:

The Gay Gordons

The Gay Gordon is traditionally initial dance of the night. This party is over 130 yrs old, and ended up being known as after a popular army regiment through the north-east of Scotland called the Gordon Highlanders. It is almost always danced to a march like ‘Scotland the Brave’ or even the tune ‘The Gordon Highlanders’. Link to video clip and measures

Dashing White Sergeant

Strip the WillowThis is an organization dance so you’ll have to gather in groups of three. It’s a reel, plus it’s a very sociable party, changing partners once in awhile, meaning your selection of three gets the opportunity to dancing with lots of different folks. It goes around 150 years, having initially recognition within the mid 19th century. You will probably find that different villages or various areas of the nation have actually somewhat different versions, particularly in the reeling component, nonetheless it does not matter which version you do. It'll work. The Dashing White Sergeant tune ended up being composed by Sir Henry Rowley Bishop with terms by General John Burgoyne. Backlink to video clip and steps

Strip the Willow

Remove the Willow is an organization party with one long-line of gents facing an extended distinct females. All you should do is grab yourself somebody and stand opposite all of them in-line. Strip the Willow is a vintage Hebridean weaving party. On 30 December 2000, 1, 914 folks danced the biggest Strip the Willow as an element of Edinburgh’s Hogmanay parties within ‘Night Afore Fiesta’. The dance can also be generally Drops of Brandy. Url to video and actions

Ceilidh Bands

You will find probably as numerous Ceilidh bands in Scotland as you will find town halls, and likely even more. But for me personally discover one musical organization that stand out and who've their very own Ceilidh House in Oban inside West of Scotland, they truly are Skipinnish. We have included a video below filmed during a Ceilidh in Oban. You can view a few of the dances and you may see Skipinnish perform. A most enjoyable movie.

Source: www.scotlandinfo.eu
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