Scottish Celtic Art

May 15, 2015
Edinburgh Scottish Celtic

Iron Age gold torc, present Blair Drummond included in a hoard comprising four torcs.The idea of a shared Celtic heritage across ancient Europe keeps a powerful hold over the well-known imagination. But the majority of common tips concerning the people generally ‘Celts’ have been newer re-imaginings, revived and reinvented within the centuries.

This major exhibition, organised in partnership with the Brit Museum, unravels the complex story for the various groups who have used or already been given the name ‘Celts’ through extraordinary art items they made and used.

Spanning above 2, 500 many years, the event explores history through these effective decorated items and examines exactly how art styles have altered considerably as time passes, often flourishing during periods when various cultures came into contact.

  • Iron Age gold torc, present Blair Drummond within a hoard comprising four torcs.
  • Huge armlet of bronze from Belhelvie, Aberdeenshire, 200-300 advertising.
  • Sculpture associated with the goddess Brigantia depicting a local goddess from northern Britain into the guise of Minerva, from Birrens, Dumfriesshire.
  • Comb manufactured from bone, probably always brush a beard or moustache, from Langbank Crannog, Renfrewshire, 0-200 advertising.
  • 8th century brooch-pin from Westness, Rousay, Orkney.
  • Reconstruction of this Deskford carnyx (80 - 200 AD), in bronze and brass, made by Dr John Purser and John Creed.
  • Bronze pony limit within a moss at Torrs, Kelton, Kirkcudbrightshire, 300–100 BC.
  • Massive armlet of bronze from Belhelvie, Aberdeenshire, 200-300 AD. Slab of grey sandstone with a cross on one side. From Monifieth, Angus, Scotland, c. advertising 700–800.
  • Double-faced horned Iron Age statue, perhaps representing a god. Holzgerlingen, Germany, 4th–2nd century BC. © P Frankenstein/H Zwietasch, Landesmuseum Württemberg, Stuttgart.
  • The Battersea guard. Iron Age, c. 350–50 BC. Based in the River Thames, London, The United Kingdomt. © The Trustees for the Uk Museum.
  • The Gundestrup cauldron. Iron Age, c. 100 BC–AD 1. present in Gundestrup, northern Jutland, Denmark. © The Nationwide Museum of Denmark.
  • Bull-headed torc from south Germany. © P. Frankenstein / H. Zwietasch; Landesmuseum Württemberg, Stuttgart
  • The Druids: attracting the Mistletoe (1890) by George Henry and Edward Atkinson Hornel. © CSG CIC Glasgow Museums Collection.

Sculpture of the goddess Brigantia depicting a local goddess from northern Britain inside guise of Minerva, from Birrens, Dumfriesshire. Find magnificent Iron Age treasures adorned with complex habits and great creatures, rich with concealed definitions, of used for feasting, spiritual ceremonies, adornment and warfare. Understand how these distinctive art styles were changed and took in brand-new influences responding into expanding Roman world additionally the spread of Christianity. Then analyze how the decorative arts associated with the late nineteenth century had been prompted by various ideas about Europe’s past, and played a vital role in defining exactly what it supposed to be Irish, Welsh, Scottish and British.

Featuring above 300 treasured things from across the British and Europe, put together together in Scotland for the first time, this is certainly an original opportunity to explore the notion of ‘Celts’ as one of the fundamental building blocks of European record.

To complement the event the British Museum and National Museums Scotland will provide two unique Iron Age mirrors to five companion museums throughout the UNITED KINGDOM in 2015-16. There is away more info on the Reflections on Celts tour right here.

Previously wondered what an ancient Celtic war horn feels like? Or how-to put on an Iron Age torc that weighs over 1kg? Event curators Julia Farley and Fraser Hunter introduce some crucial objects from exhibition inside Periscope movie.

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Exhibition information

Simply how much

Adult £10
Concession £8*
Child (12-15) £6.50
Under 12s Free

National Art Pass holders get 50% discount (only available in person by phone).

* Concession prices apply to 60+, students and unemployed with ID, handicapped folks. Carers of disabled people no-cost. A valid NUS or younger Scot card should be shown.

All seats include a discretionary contribution. If you do not wish to make an altruistic contribution the admission costs are the following: Adult £9, Concession £7.20, Child £5.85.

Booking information

Book seats on line, face-to-face on Museum, or by calling 0300 123 6789.

Book passes
Comb made from bone,  probably accustomed brush a beard or moustache,  from Langbank Crannog,  Renfrewshire,  0-200 AD. 8th century brooch-pin from Westness,  Rousay,  Orkney. Reconstruction of the Deskford carnyx (80 - 200 AD),  in bronze and brass,  created by Dr John Purser and John Creed. Bronze pony cap found in a moss at Torrs,  Kelton,  Kirkcudbrightshire,  300–100 BC.
Source: www.nms.ac.uk
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