Classical Bagpipe music

March 16, 2016
Scottish Highland Games
The many satisfying recordings of Saint-Saëns's Symphony # 3 are those created using organ and orchestra in fact in identical location. There is a famously beefy version performed by Barenboim, in which the organ of Notre Dame is superimposed regarding the Chicago Symphony, nonetheless it seems wrong – the organ should be the main orchestral surface. This symphony is a much smarter piece than it has been provided credit for. Saint-Saëns's transitions work so well – the Allegro moderato's winding down is an excellent minute, and the scherzo's getting thinner down prior to the organ entry is magical. Everyone loves this performance's athleticism; rhythms tend to be delectably directed and there's no indulgence. Woodwind and brass tonguing is effortless. The Poco adagio's motif smoulders, together with piano duet's entry is properly amusing. Jan Kraybill's contemporary organ appears suitably resplendent but she knows that the colours are far more interesting than decibels. That is however a sonic dazzling though, and Saint-Saëns's coda, where in actuality the music appears to speed up whilst metrically slowing down, is terrific. Strongly suggested.

Latina Cristina Pato (Sunnyside)

The simple mention of bagpipes will give some audience the heebie-jeebies, but phobics will like this disc. Spanish-born Cristina Pato is a leading gaita (Galician bagpipes) player. She relocated to nyc to keep her classical piano researches, and plays both devices right here, backed by bass, drums and accordion. The gaita's chanter has a-sharp brilliant tone; its drones are smooth and reedy. In Pato's fingers the instrument is disconcertingly agile. She is additionally in a position to bend the notes, offering a number of the tunes right here a tremendously vocal quality. Bass player Edward Perezis the Latina 6/8 Suite fills most of this disc, an engaging collection which plays with different Italian, Latin American and Spanish 6/8 rhythms. In Pato's words: “The word Latina originates from Latin, which originated in Italy. From Sicily arrived the tarantella, which is therefore closely related to the Galician muiñeira.”

The combination of styles and influences hangs collectively well, although the even more striking figures are the rawer, less polished people. Like “Muiñeira de Chantada”, its twisty melody dancing over one drone note, initially followed closely by exactly what seems like stamping legs and an unhinged roar from Pato. Or even the brilliant “María Lando” featuring its stark, free opening, and Pato's daringly sluggish upward glissando near the close. Additionally an infectious number by Argentinian composer Emilio Solla and an accordion-drenched party by Victor Prieto.

Source: www.theartsdesk.com
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